With a Picked Lock and a Threatened Indictment, Mueller’s Inquiry Sets a Tone – The New York Times

With a Picked Lock and a Threatened Indictment, Mueller’s Inquiry Sets a Tone – The New York Times

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

8:42 AM

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Paul D. Manafort, President Trump’s former campaign chairman, in June 2016. Prosecutors in the Russia investigation told Mr. Manafort they planned to indict him, two people close to the investigation said. Credit Brendan McDermid/Reuters

WASHINGTON — Paul J. Manafort was in bed early one morning in July when federal agents bearing a search warrant picked the lock on his front door and raided his Virginia home. They took binders stuffed with documents and copied his computer files, looking for evidence that Mr. Manafort, President Trump’s former campaign chairman, set up secret offshore bank accounts. They even photographed the expensive suits in his closet.

The special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III, then followed the house search with a warning: His prosecutors told Mr. Manafort they planned to indict him, said two people close to the investigation.

The moves against Mr. Manafort are just a glimpse of the aggressive tactics used by Mr. Mueller and his team of prosecutors in the four months since taking over the Justice Department’s investigation into Russia’s attempts to disrupt last year’s election, according to lawyers, witnesses and American officials who have described the approach. Dispensing with the plodding pace typical of many white-collar investigations, Mr. Mueller’s team has used what some describe as shock-and-awe tactics to intimidate witnesses and potential targets of the inquiry.

Mr. Mueller has obtained a flurry of subpoenas to compel witnesses to testify before a grand jury, lawyers and witnesses say, sometimes before his prosecutors have taken the customary first step of interviewing them. One witness was called before the grand jury less than a month after his name surfaced in news accounts. The special counsel even took the unusual step of obtaining a subpoena for one of Mr. Manafort’s former lawyers, claiming an exception to the rule that shields attorney-client discussions from scrutiny.

“They are setting a tone. It’s important early on to strike terror in the hearts of people in Washington, or else you will be rolled,” said Solomon L. Wisenberg, who was deputy independent counsel in the investigation that led to the impeachment trial of President Bill Clinton in 1999. “You want people saying to themselves, ‘Man, I had better tell these guys the truth.’”

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A spokesman for Mr. Mueller declined to comment. Lawyers and a spokesman for Mr. Manafort also declined to comment.

Few people can upend Washington like a federal prosecutor rooting around a presidential administration, and Mr. Mueller, a former F.B.I. director, is known to dislike meandering investigations that languish for years. At the same time, he appears to be taking a broad view of his mandate: examining not just the Russian disruption campaign and whether any of Mr. Trump’s associates assisted in the effort, but also any financial entanglements with Russians going back several years. He is also investigating whether Mr. Trump tried to obstruct justice when he fired James B. Comey, the F.B.I. director.

Mr. Manafort is under investigation for possible violations of tax laws, money-laundering prohibitions and requirements to disclose foreign lobbying. Michael T. Flynn, the former national security adviser, is being scrutinized for foreign lobbying work as well as for conversations he had last year with Russia’s ambassador to the United States. On Monday, Mr. Flynn’s siblings announced the creation of a legal-defense fund to help cover their brother’s “enormous” legal fees.

The wide-ranging nature of Mr. Mueller’s investigation could put him on a collision course with Mr. Trump, who has said publicly that Mr. Mueller should keep his investigation narrowly focused on last year’s presidential campaign. In an interview with The New York Times, Mr. Trump said Mr. Mueller would be overstepping his boundaries if he investigated his family’s finances unrelated to Russia.

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Mr. Manafort’s apartment in Alexandria, Va., was searched in July. Credit Win McNamee/Getty Images

For the moment, Mr. Mueller’s team has shown a measure of deference to White House officials, sparing them grand jury subpoenas and allowing them to appear for voluntary interviews. Those sessions are expected to begin soon. Ty Cobb, a lawyer brought in to manage the White House response to the inquiry, has told administration officials that he wants to avoid any subpoenas from the special prosecutor.

Staff members have been working long hours answering Mr. Mueller’s request for 13 categories of documents, including records related to Mr. Comey’s firing and Mr. Trump’s role in drafting a misleading statement about a June 2016 meeting between campaign officials and Russian-born visitors. Nonetheless, the demand for documents has provoked at least one angry confrontation between Mr. Cobb and Donald F. McGahn II, the White House counsel, over whether certain documents should be withheld to protect the president’s right to confidentiality.

But associates of both Mr. Manafort and Mr. Flynn have received more peremptory treatment. Instead of invitations to the prosecutor’s office, they have been presented with grand jury subpoenas, forcing them to either testify or take the Fifth Amendment and raise suspicions that they had something to hide. At least three witnesses have recently been subpoenaed to testify about Mr. Manafort: Jason Maloni, a spokesman who appeared before the grand jury for more than two hours on Friday, and the heads of two consulting firms — Mercury Public Affairs and the Podesta Group — who worked with Mr. Manafort on behalf of Viktor F. Yanukovych, the pro-Russia former president of Ukraine.

Mr. Mueller’s team also took the unusual step of issuing a subpoena to Melissa Laurenza, a specialist in lobbying law who formerly represented Mr. Manafort, according to people familiar with the subpoena. Conversations between lawyers and their clients are normally considered bound by attorney-client privilege, but there are exceptions when lawyers prepare public documents that are filed on behalf of their client.

Mr. Mueller took over the Russia investigation in May, after the F.B.I. had already spent nearly a year looking into connections between Mr. Trump’s associates and Russians. His team has occasionally been caught by surprise, hearing of possibly important information only when it is revealed in the news media.

This was the case in July, when Mr. Mueller’s prosecutors learned about email exchanges between Donald Trump Jr. and an emissary for a Kremlin-connected Russian oligarch only after they were disclosed in The New York Times, according to a law enforcement official who spoke on condition of anonymity. Donald Trump Jr., the president’s son, set up the Trump Tower meeting to receive what he was told would be damaging information about Hillary Clinton from the Russian government.

Soon after his name surfaced, one of the Russian-born participants at the meeting, Rinat Akhmetshin, was ordered to testify before the grand jury, according to one of Mr. Akhmetshin’s associates.

“They seem to be pursuing this more aggressively, taking a much harder line, than you’d expect to see in a typical white collar case,” said Jimmy Gurulé, a Notre Dame law professor and former federal prosecutor. “This is more consistent with how you’d go after an organized crime syndicate.”

The tactics reflect some of the hard-charging — and polarizing — personalities of Mr. Mueller’s team, seasoned prosecutors with experience investigating financial fraud, money laundering and organized crime.

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Robert S. Mueller III, a former F.B.I director, is known to dislike meandering investigations that languish for years. Credit Doug Mills/The New York Times

Admirers of Andrew Weissmann, one of the team’s senior prosecutors, describe him as relentless and uncompromising, while his detractors say his scorched earth tactics have backfired in some previous cases. Greg B. Andres, another one of Mr. Mueller’s prosecutors, once ran an investigation into a Mafia kingpin. Zainab N. Ahmad made her name as a prosecutor pursing high-profile terrorism cases.

Some lawyers defending people who have been caught up in Mr. Mueller’s investigation privately complain that the special counsel’s team is unwilling to engage in the usual back-and-forth that precedes — or substitutes for — grand jury testimony. They argue that the team’s more aggressive tactics might end up being counterproductive, especially if some grand jury witnesses turn out to be more guarded than they would have been in a more informal setting or invoke the Fifth Amendment.

The longer Mr. Mueller’s investigation goes on, the more vulnerable he will be to allegations that he is on a fishing expedition, said Katy Harriger, a professor of politics at Wake Forest University and the author of a book on special prosecutors. Such accusations dogged the investigation of Kenneth W. Starr, the independent counsel whose investigation of Mr. Clinton stretched on for years.

To a degree, Mr. Mueller is in a race against three congressional committees that are interviewing some of same people who are of interest to the special prosecutor’s team. Even if the committees refuse to grant them immunity, congressional testimony that becomes public can give other witnesses a chance to line up their stories.

Rep. Adam Schiff of California, the top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, said committee staff members were going to great lengths not to get in Mr. Mueller’s way. But Senator Charles E. Grassley, the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, indicated last week that his committee might subpoena witnesses to testify about the circumstances of Mr. Comey’s firing even over Mr. Mueller’s objections.

Mr. Mueller’s need to navigate this complex landscape could explain the timing of the raid on Mr. Manafort’s house, which took place in the early hours of July 26. The raid came one day after Mr. Manafort was interviewed by staff members of the Senate Intelligence Committee.

On the day of the raid, Mr. Manafort was scheduled to talk to the Senate Judiciary Committee, an interview that was eventually canceled.

It is unusual for a prosecutor to seek a search warrant against someone who, like Mr. Manafort, had already put his lawyer in contact with the Justice Department. No search warrants were executed during the investigations by Mr. Starr or Patrick J. Fitzgerald, a special counsel appointed during the George W. Bush administration to investigate the leak of the name of a C.I.A. officer.

To get the warrant, Mr. Mueller’s team had to show probable cause that Mr. Manafort’s home contained evidence of a crime. To be allowed to pick the lock and enter the home unannounced, prosecutors had to persuade a federal judge that Mr. Manafort was likely to destroy evidence.

Said Mr. Gurulé, the former federal prosecutor, “Clearly they didn’t trust him.”

Kenneth P. Vogel, Matthew Rosenberg and Rebecca Ruiz contributed reporting.

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a researcher wants to observe preschoolers at a local public playground to evaluate levels of cooperation. the researcher will not interact with the children. this research would be eligible for which type of irb review?

a researcher wants to observe preschoolers at a local public playground to evaluate levels of cooperation. the researcher will not interact with the children. this research would be eligible for which type of irb review?

Friday, September 15, 2017

11:08 PM

A researcher wants to observe preschoolers at a local public playground to evaluate levels of cooperation. The researcher will not interact with the children. This research would be eligible for which type of IRB review?

This research would not require IRB review because it would be eligible for exemption since the researcher is not interacting with the children and the playground is a public setting.

This research would require full committee review since it involves children.

This research would be eligible for expedited IRB review since the researcher is participating in the activities observed.

This research would be eligible for expedited IRB review since the researcher is not interacting with the children and the playground is public.

Answer: This research would not require IRB review because it would be eligible for exemption since the researcher is not interacting with the children and the playground is a public setting.

Hello, world. Meet our baby girl: Alexis Olympia Ohanian, Jr. – YouTube

Hello, world. Meet our baby girl: Alexis Olympia Ohanian, Jr. – YouTube

Thursday, September 14, 2017

1:32 PM

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Clipped from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CYoRmfI0LUc

For what accomplishment is Frederick Muhlenberg remembered?

For what accomplishment is Frederick Muhlenberg remembered?

Sunday, September 10, 2017

5:42 PM

For what accomplishment is Frederick Muhlenberg remembered?

· First Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives

· First German U.S. governor

· Invented hot air balloons

· Holder of U.S. Patent #1

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· First Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives 22.4%

Unable to make ends meet as a minister, Muhlenberg entered politics in 1779 as a member of the Continental Congress. He won election to the first U.S. Congress from Pennsylvania in 1789. He agreed to serve as the first Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives and became the first signer of the Bill of Rights. He won reelection multiple times, serving as Speaker again for the third U.S. Congress. Source: SpeakersHouse.org

· First German U.S. governor 16.1%

· Invented hot air balloons 32.5%

· Holder of U.S. Patent # 129.0%

What was the deadliest hurricane in U.S. history?

What was the deadliest hurricane in U.S. history?

Sunday, September 10, 2017

5:26 PM

What was the deadliest hurricane in U.S. history?

· Great Miami Hurricane 1926

· Hurricane Andrew 1992

· Hurricane Katrina in 2005

· The Great Galveston Hurricane of 1900

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Answer: The Great Galveston Hurricane was a Category 4 storm, with winds of up to 145 mph per hour, which made landfall on September 8, 1900, in Galveston, Texas, leaving about 6,000 to 12,000 dead. It was the deadliest hurricane in U.S. history. Unfortunately for the residents of Galveston, meteorology was far from an exact science at the end of the 19th century, and they received little warning about the storm’s strength. Even if one uses the low estimate of 6,000 victims, this storm remains the deadliest ever to hit the United States.

Fires destroy more villages in Myanmar’s Rohingya region: sources

Fires destroy more villages in Myanmar’s Rohingya region: sources

Sunday, September 10, 2017

10:56 AM

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YANGON (Reuters) – Several more villages were burned down on Saturday in a part of northwest Myanmar where many Rohingya Muslims had been sheltering from violence sweeping the area, two sources monitoring the situation said.

The fires, which started on Friday when up to eight villages went up in flames in the ethnically mixed Rathedaung region, have increased concerns that more minority Rohingya will flee to neighboring Bangladesh.

Blazes started on Saturday engulfed as many as four more settlements in Rathedaung, likely destroying all the Muslim villages in the area, the sources said.

“Slowly, one after another villages are being burnt down – I believe that Rohingyas are already wiped out completely from Rathedaung,” said Chris Lewa of the Rohingya monitoring group, the Arakan Project.

“There were 11 Muslim villages (in Rathedaung) and after the past two days all appear to be destroyed.”

It was unclear who set fire to the villages, located in a part of northwest Myanmar far from where Rohingya insurgents attacked 30 police posts and an army base last month, triggering an army counter-offensive in which at least 400 people have been killed.

Independent journalists are not allowed into the area, where Myanmar says its security forces are carrying out clearance operations to defend against “extremist terrorists”.

Human rights monitors and fleeing Rohingya say the army and ethnic Rakhine vigilantes have unleashed a campaign of arson aimed at driving out the Muslim population. Some 290,000 people have fled across the Bangladeshi border in less than two weeks, causing a humanitarian crisis.

Rathedaung is the furthest Rohingya-inhabited area from the border with Bangladesh and aid workers are concerned that a large number of people were trapped there.

The sources said that among the torched villages was the hamlet of Tha Pyay Taw. They were also concerned about the village of Chin Ywa, where many people sheltering from other burnings in the area had been hiding and two other settlements.

On Friday, the villages of Ah Htet Nan Yar and Auk Nan Yar, some 65 km (40 miles) north of Sittwe, capital of Rakhine state, were also burned along with four to six other settlements.

One source, who has a network of informers in the area, said 300 to 400 Rohingya who had been hiding at Ah Htet Nan Yar were now in the forest or attempting a perilous, days-long journey by foot in the monsoon rain toward the River Naf separating Myanmar and Bangladesh.

Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi said on Thursday her government was doing its best to protect everyone, but she has drawn criticism for failing to speak out about the violence and the Muslim minority, including calls to revoke her 1991 Nobel Peace Prize.

The country’s Rohingya Muslims have long complained of persecution and are seen by many in Buddhist-majority Myanmar as illegal migrants from Bangladesh.

Editing by Helen Popper

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

What fruit gives chefs a choice of red, black or white?

What fruit gives chefs a choice of red, black or white?

Saturday, September 9, 2017

2:59 AM

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· Apples 3.29%

· Raspberries 24.0%

· Plums 29.1%

· Currants 43.6% – answer

Real currants are members of the flowering shrub family Ribes. They are naturally a deep, dark purple, a brilliant ruby red, or an almost translucent white berry. They are at their most delicious when served fresh but can dry like raisins. All varieties of this fruit have a distinctive acid "kick" to balance out their sweetness. They are particularly popular in fresh fruit berry mixes or as a garnish to desserts. Source: TheSpruce.com

Before becoming a successful film director, Rob Reiner played Michael Stivic on what classic sitcom?

Before becoming a successful film director, Rob Reiner played Michael Stivic on what classic sitcom?

Saturday, September 9, 2017

2:07 AM

Before becoming a successful film director, Rob Reiner played Michael Stivic on what classic sitcom?

o Happy Days

o Soap

o Taxi

o All in the Family

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Answer: Robert Reiner enjoyed success in the entertainment industry as an actor, a writer and a director. As an actor, Reiner first came to national prominence with the role of Michael Stivic on All in the Family. He was the live-in son-in-law of the series’ lead character, Archie Bunker, who frequently called him "Meathead". He went on to explore the world behind the camera with films like Stand By Me, When Harry Met Sally, The Princess Bride, and A Few Good Men. Rob Reiner is the son of comedic genius Carl Reiner.

o All in the Family – answer

Caribbean Devastated as Irma Heads Toward Florida – The New York Times

Caribbean Devastated as Irma Heads Toward Florida – The New York Times

Saturday, September 9, 2017

1:10 AM

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U.S.

By FRANCES ROBLES, KIRK SEMPLE and VIVIAN YEESEPT. 7, 2017

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Extreme Weather By BARBARA MARCOLINI Play Video 1:12 ‘We Have Nothing Left’: Islanders Survey Irma’s Destruction

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‘We Have Nothing Left’: Islanders Survey Irma’s Destruction

Two residents from St. Martin island’s two nations, the French St. Martin and the Dutch St. Maarten, describe Irma’s destruction.

By BARBARA MARCOLINI on Publish Date September 7, 2017. Photo by Lionel Chamoiseau/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images. Watch in Times Video »

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Read the latest with Friday’s live updates on Hurricane Irma.

SAN JUAN, P.R. — One of the most powerful Atlantic hurricanes ever recorded crescendoed over the Caribbean on Thursday, crumpling islands better known as beach paradises into half-habitable emergency zones and sideswiping Puerto Rico before churning north. It is expected to hit the Florida Keys and South Florida by Saturday night.

More than 60 percent of households in Puerto Rico were without power. On St. Martin, an official said 95 percent of the island was destroyed. The Haitian government called for all agencies, stores and banks to shut down as the storm hit. Prime Minister Gaston Browne of Antigua and Barbuda said that half of Barbuda had been left homeless.

Watching Hurricane Irma maraud across Barbuda and Anguilla, residents of Florida and others who found themselves on the wrong side of the forecast were hastening to get out of the way. Government officials in Florida, Georgia and South Carolina pleaded for people to evacuate vulnerable areas, triggering a scramble for the essentials — gasoline, water, sandbags — that, even for hurricane-hardened Floridians, was laced with dread and punctuated with dire warnings from every direction.

A shortage of gasoline and bottled water, always a headache in the days before hurricanes, grew more acute in the wake of Hurricane Harvey, as the production of Houston oil refineries shrank and fuel and water were diverted to Texas. Pump lines in South Florida sprawled for blocks as fleeing residents sucked up what gas they could, and some drivers chased after tankers they had spied on the roads.

Gov. Rick Scott of Florida urged extreme caution in the face of a powerful storm that could quickly change course. “Every Florida family must prepare to evacuate regardless of the coast you live on,” he said.

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By the time Rosi Edreira and her husband got the order to leave their home in Cutler Bay, part of the second evacuation zone in Miami-Dade County, they had already made plans to seek shelter in Charlotte, N.C. Into the car would go photo albums, birth certificates, nearly 400 Christmas ornaments collected over a quarter-century and their two dogs, JJ and Coco Puff, and cat, Dicky.

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Felipe Martinez removed fallen branches in San Juan, P.R., on Thursday. Credit Erika P. Rodriguez for The New York Times

“I did Andrew,” said Ms. Edreira, 49, recalling the massive Category 5 hurricane that ripped off her roof 25 years ago last month. “I’m not doing that again.”

By Thursday night, Irma’s 175-mile-an-hour winds and pelting rains had already serially ransacked the islands of the eastern Caribbean, leaving at least seven dead and whole communities flattened.

Not all the news was awful. Despite the loss of power to most of the island, damage and loss of life on Puerto Rico was far less than feared. Haiti and the Dominican Republic, which share the island of Hispaniola, were also spared direct hits.

But the terror of the storm left people grasping for superlatives.

“There are shipwrecks everywhere, destroyed houses everywhere, torn-off roofs everywhere,” the president of the French territorial council on St. Martin, Daniel Gibbs, told Radio Caraïbes International.

“It’s just unbelievable,” he added. “It’s indescribable.”

In Puerto Rico — among Irma’s less unfortunate casualties — the lights were out. In many places, so was running water.

Though the hurricane barely brushed the island, it managed to knock out its aging electrical system. More than a million customers were without power on Thursday, and a little more than half of the hospitals were functional. Even before a single raindrop fell, the head of the company, which is effectively bankrupt, had predicted that if the storm packed a wallop, it could take four to six months to completely re-establish service. His prediction infuriated Puerto Ricans, who see the latest development as yet another shameful indignity in the island’s yearslong economic decline.

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Buildings were damaged by Hurricane Irma on the French side of the island of St. Martin on Thursday. Credit Lionel Chamoiseau/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

How is it possible, they wanted to know, that a hurricane that had passed at a safe distance and hardly claimed a shingle could leave so many in the dark?

Puerto Rico’s plunge into darkness has been long coming. In July, the huge, government-owned power authority defaulted on a deal to restructure $9 billion in debt, effectively declaring bankruptcy.

It has neither modernized nor kept up with maintenance. Trees have gone untrimmed, poles unattended. (The electric company did not respond to repeated requests for comment.)

Gov. Ricardo A. Rosselló said the authorities could not estimate how long it would take to get the power back until officials were able to survey the damage.

Thursday afternoon he said service had been restored to 144,000 households — which still left nearly a million out.

Still, he said, things could have been much worse.

“We would like to start out thanking the almighty,” Mr. Rosselló said. “Our prayers were answered.”

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Residents in Port St. Lucie, Fla., prepared for Hurricane Irma’s approach at Home Depot. Credit Jason Henry for The New York Times

On other islands, the reckoning was far more stark.

On St. Martin, a part-French, part-Dutch possession where at least four people died as a result of the storm, aerial footage taken by the military showed streets inundated with water and homes devastated by winds. The second wave of destruction, for businesses at least, was man-made: looters were picking through the remains, sometimes in view of police officers who stood idly by, “as if they were buying groceries,” said Maeva-Myriam Ponet, a correspondent for a television network based in Guadeloupe, another French Overseas Territory in the Caribbean.

St. Martin remained mostly isolated from the outside world on Thursday, lacking power and most cellphone service.

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Ms. Ponet, who reports for the Guadeloupe 1ère network, said the residents of St. Martin felt utterly neglected. “Help will arrive tonight,” she said, “but for the moment, they don’t have anything.”

The nearby island of St. Barthélemy, another French territory, was also hard hit, as was Barbuda, where half of the island’s residents were reportedly left homeless.

The network’s correspondent in St. Barthélemy, Eric Rayapin, described a “spectacle of desolation,” with the island all but severed from the outside world. There had been little or no phone service, water or electricity since Tuesday night.

Buildings have been “ravaged,” he said, and many roads have been destroyed.

“The population here is suffering enormously,” Mr. Rayapin reported. “Some of them have lost their houses, the cars have been flipped over in the middle of the street, and all vegetation has been destroyed.”

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Rue Kindred hung hurricane shutters on his home in White City, Fla., on Thursday. Credit Jason Henry for The New York Times

He added: ”It’s a very hard blow.”

John McKendrick, Anguilla’s attorney general, said that the island, a British possession, had suffered “huge devastation” from the hurricane.

Most of the island’s homes had been damaged, fallen trees had blocked many roads, cellphone service was interrupted and electrical service was cut. The entire island was still without power midday Thursday, and the ports and the airport remained closed. One person in Anguilla died, Mr. Kendrick said, though he did not know the circumstances.

“It’s been bad,” Mr. McKendrick said in a telephone interview from London, where he had been traveling when the hurricane struck the island. “A lot of people are exhausted and a lot of homes are damaged.”

He said the authorities were still trying to assess the full scope of the destruction.

In Haiti, the government called for all institutions to be shut down from noon on Thursday until further notice. President Jovenel Moïse urged people to get to a safe place.

“The hurricane is not a game,” he said.

The danger was not only of drownings and injuries from the storm. Officials worried that a surge of cholera could follow, as it did last year after Hurricane Matthew devastated the country’s southwest. Government reports show that cholera has killed 104 people this year. More than 10,000 peopl have died from the waterborne disease since it broke out in Haiti in 2010. In an effort to avert another flare-up, Haiti’s minister of public health urged people to add bleach to their drinking and bathing water and to assemble first-aid kits at home.

Among the deepest concerns of Mr. McKendrick, the Anguilla attorney general, was the approach of Hurricane Jose, declared a Category 3 storm on Thursday, which is expected to make its way through this same part of the Caribbean on Saturday. A Hurricane Watch was in effect for Antigua and Barbuda and a Tropical Storm watch was issued for Anguilla, Montserrat, St. Kitts, Nevis, Saba and St. Eustatius.

“A 137-mile-per-hour storm is on the way,” he said. “I’m not sure how the island can respond to that.”

In Miami, Elizabeth Chifari, 66, was determined to stay home with her white alley cat, Friday, and ride out the storm.

She would have gone to stay with her son, Andrew. But he lives in Houston.

“If they lived anywhere else,” she said, “I would’ve considered it.”

Correction: September 8, 2017

Because of an editing error, an earlier version of this article misstated the number of people in Haiti who have died from cholera since the disease’s outbreak there in 2010. More than 10,000 people have died since the outbreak, not 104. (That is the number who have died from cholera this year, government reports show.)

Frances Robles reported from San Juan, P.R., Kirk Semple from Mexico City and Vivian Yee from New York. Catherine Porter contributed from Haiti; Maggie Astor, Luis Ferré-Sadurní and Megan Specia from New York; Marc Santora, Emily Cochrane and Lizette Alvarez from Miami; Erica Wells in the Bahamas; Carl Joseph in Barbuda; Azam Ahmed in the Dominican Republic; Paulina Villegas in Mexico City; and Aurelien Breeden and Elian Peltier in Paris.

A version of this article appears in print on September 8, 2017, on Page A1 of the New York edition with the headline: Irma Razes Islands and Leaves Puerto Rico Dark. Order Reprints| Today’s Paper|Subscribe

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where is hurricane irma now

where is hurricane irma now

Friday, September 8, 2017

8:09 PM

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What you need to know now

· Forecasts: The National Hurricane Center will provide updated forecasts at 11 a.m., 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. ET.

· Where Irma is today: The Category 4 storm will mostly be over open water as it heads for the US. It may brush Cuba.

· Florida: Southern Florida is bracing for a direct hit early Sunday. The storm will drift over the entire state.

· Turks and Caicos: The catastrophic storm hit the island overnight.