Question: The Latin phrase “caveat emptor” translates to which of the following?

Answer: Caveat emptor is a Latin phrase that can be roughly translated in English to “let the buyer beware.” While the phrase is sometimes used as a proverb in English, it is also sometimes used in legal contracts as a type of disclaimer. In many jurisdictions, it is the contract law principle that places the onus on the buyer to perform due diligence before making a purchase. The term is commonly used in real property transactions–as it relates to the sale of real estate property, and transactions of other types of goods, such as cars.

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1  What Does Caveat Emptor Mean?
Welcome to the Investors Trading Academy talking glossary of financial terms and events. Our word of the day is “Caveat Emptor” Caveat emptor is Latin for “Let the buyer beware” Under the principle of caveat emptor, the buyer could not recover damages from the seller for defects on the property that rendered the property unfit for …
Watch Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o32ngMsTEMY

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1The Latin phrase “caveat emptor” translates to “Let the buyer beware”
…Caveat emptor is a Latin phrase that can be roughly translated in English to “let the buyer beware.” While the phrase is sometimes used as a proverb in English, it is also sometimes used in legal contracts as a type of disclaimer.
https://www.try3steps.com/2020/08/answer-latin-phrase-caveat-emptor.html

2Caveat Emptor

Caveat emptor is a neo-Latin phrase meaning “let the buyer beware.” It is a principle of contract law in many jurisdictions that places the onus on the buyer to perform due diligence before making …
https://www.investopedia.com/terms/c/caveatemptor.asp

3Caveat Emptor

Caveat emptor (/ ˈ ɛ m p t ɔːr /; from caveat, “may he beware”, a subjunctive form of cavēre, “to beware” + ēmptor, “buyer”) is Latin for “Let the buyer beware”. It has become a proverb in English. Generally, caveat emptor is the contract law principle that controls the sale of real property after the date of closing, but may also apply to sales of other goods.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caveat_emptor

4Caveat Emptor

What is Caveat Emptor? Caveat emptor is a Latin phrase that is translated as “let the buyer beware.” The phrase describes the concept in contract law that places the burden of due diligence Types of Due Diligence One of the most important and lengthy processes in an M&A deal is Due Diligence. The process of due diligence is something which the buyer conducts to confirm the accuracy of the …
https://corporatefinanceinstitute.com/resources/knowledge/other/caveat-emptor-buyer-beware/

5Caveat Emptor

Caveat emptor is a Latin term that means “let the buyer beware.” Similar to the phrase “sold as is,” this term means that the buyer assumes the risk that a product may fail to meet expectations or have defects. In other words, the principle of caveat emptor serves as a warning that buyers have no recourse with the seller if the product does not …
https://consumer.findlaw.com/consumer-transactions/what-does-caveat-emptor-mean-.html

6The Latin phrase “caveat emptor” translates to “Let the buyer beware”
caveat emptor translation in Latin-English dictionary. Showing page 1. Found 1 sentences matching phrase “caveat emptor”.Found in 0 ms.
https://glosbe.com/la/en/caveat%20emptor

7Caveat Emptor

caveat emptor: [noun] a principle in commerce: without a warranty the buyer takes the risk.
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/caveat%20emptor

8The Latin phrase “caveat emptor” translates to “Let the buyer beware”
Let the buyer beware phrase. What does Let the buyer beware expression mean? Definitions by the largest Idiom Dictionary. Let the buyer beware – Idioms by The Free Dictionary. … According to the Legal Information Institute, caveat emptor is a Latin phrase for “let the buyer beware.”
https://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/Let+the+buyer+beware

9The Latin phrase “caveat emptor” translates to “Let the buyer beware”
The principle of ‘Caveat Emptor’ has been used by British Courts since the medieval times and its origins date back even further. The Latin phrase translates to ‘let the buyer beware.’ The idea behind this principle is that the buyer alone is responsible for checking the physical condition of the property along with whether there are any legal issues surrounding the property or its owners.
https://www.ehlsolicitors.co.uk/the-purchase-of-auction-properties-and-the-principle-of-caveat-emptor/

10The Latin phrase “caveat emptor” translates to “Let the buyer beware”
Step 1 : Introduction to the question “Which Latin phrase means ‘let the buyer beware’?…1. Caveat emptor 2. Pro bono 3. Carpe diem 4. Canis canem edit Step 2 : Answer to the question “Which Latin phrase means ‘let the buyer beware’? Caveat emptor: Please let us know as comment, if the answer is not correct!
https://www.try3steps.com/2020/07/answer-which-latin-phrase-means-let.html

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Wikipedia Search Results

1.  List of Latin legal terms
University of the Philippines, 1995. Theo B. Rood. Glossarium: A Compilation of Latin Words and Phrases Generally Used in Law with English Translations. Bryanston…
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List of Latin legal terms

2.  List of Latin phrases (C)
English translations of notable Latin phrases, such as veni vidi vici and et cetera. Some of the phrases are themselves translations of Greek phrases, as…
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List of Latin phrases (C)

3.  List of Latin phrases (full)
article lists direct English translations of common Latin phrases. Some of the phrases are themselves translations of Greek phrases, as Greek rhetoric and literature…
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List of Latin phrases (full)