What does the Japanese practice of “tsundoku” refer to?

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1What does the Japanese practice of “tsundoku” refer to?
Tsundoku is the Japanese word for the tendency to buy books and not read them. My books clump together in great piles that mock me for not reading them fast enough. Of course, I come home from the library with books that I have to read before I read that pile.
https://www.japanpowered.com/japan-culture/what-does-tsundoku-mean

2What does the Japanese practice of “tsundoku” refer to?
WHAT DOES THE JAPANESE PRACTICE OF “TSUNDOKU” REFER TO?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gI6uA4E-9Jg

3Tsundoku

Tsundoku (Japanese: 積ん読) is acquiring reading materials but letting them pile up in one’s home without reading them.. The term originated in the Meiji era (1868–1912) as Japanese slang. It combines elements of tsunde-oku (積んでおく, to pile things up ready for later and leave) and dokusho (読書, reading books).It is also used to refer to books ready for reading later when they …
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tsundoku

4What does the Japanese practice of “tsundoku” refer to?
Prof Andrew Gerstle teaches pre-modern Japanese texts at the University of London. … the word doku does mean reading, so tsundoku should probably only be used when discussing literature.
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-44981013

5What does the Japanese practice of “tsundoku” refer to?
The desire to buy more books than you can physically read in one human lifetime is actually so universal, there’s a specific word for it: tsundoku.Defined as the stockpiling of books that will never be consumed, the term is a Japanese portmanteau of sorts, combining the words “tsunde” (meaning “to stack things”), “oku” (meaning “to leave for a while”) and “doku” (meaning …
https://www.huffpost.com/entry/theres-a-japanese-word-for-people-who-buy-more-books-than-they-can-actually-read_n_58f79b7ae4b029063d364226

6What does the Japanese practice of “tsundoku” refer to?
Tsundoku dates back to the Japanese Meiji era (1868–1912). The phrase ‘tsundoku sensei’ is said to appear in a text that dates back to 1879, and is likely a satirical about a teacher who had a lot of books but never read any of it. While it seem to be an insult, it is used in Japan without any stigma or ounce of insult attached to it.
https://indianexpress.com/article/lifestyle/books/tsundoku-japanese-word-collecting-books-5329210/

7What does the Japanese practice of “tsundoku” refer to?
Tsundoku dates back to the Japanese Meiji era (1868–1912). The term can be found in print as early as 1879, says Professor Andrew Gerstle, who teaches pre-modern Japanese at the University of …
https://medium.com/thrive-global/are-you-unintentionally-engaging-in-tsundoku-the-japanese-word-for-buying-books-and-never-reading-7a5c6f5d2adf

8What does the Japanese practice of “tsundoku” refer to?
There’s a Japanese word for you. Tsundoku: the acquiring of reading materials followed by letting them pile up and subsequently never reading them Prognosis: terminal.
https://www.ozy.com/around-the-world/theres-a-word-for-buying-books-and-not-reading-them/71898/

9What does the Japanese practice of “tsundoku” refer to?
Tsundoku, which literally means reading pile, is written in Japanese as 積ん読. Tsunde oku means to let something pile up and is written 積んでおく. Some wag around the turn of the century swapped out that oku (おく) in tsunde oku for doku (読) – meaning to read.
http://www.openculture.com/2014/07/tsundoku-should-enter-the-english-language.html

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1A Dip a Day: The Surprising Health Benefits of the Japanese Bath
The Japanese take more hot baths than any other people in the world. Bathing has been an important part of Japanese culture since ancient times. Today, there is growing evidence that the custom of regular bathing in hot water is part of what makes the Japanese one of the healthiest and longest-lived populations in the world.
https://www.nippon.com/en/japan-topics/g00883/
Published Date: 2020-09-29T02:11:00.0000000Z

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1  What does the Japanese practice of “tsundoku” refer to?
WHAT DOES THE JAPANESE PRACTICE OF “TSUNDOKU” REFER TO?
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