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What phrase did British Admiral Horatio Nelson coin thanks to a battle injury? “Break a leg” “Turn a blind eye” “Long in the tooth” “Give the cold shoulder”

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1.What phrase did British Admiral Horatio Nelson coin thanks to a battle injury? “Break a leg” “Turn a blind eye” “Long in the tooth” “Give the cold shoulder”

” What phrase did British Admiral Horatio Nelson coin thanks to a battle injury?. This video will give you a ‘Straight To the point’ information / answer / s…

2.What phrase did British Admiral Horatio Nelson coin thanks to a battle injury? “Break a leg” “Turn a blind eye” “Long in the tooth” “Give the cold shoulder”

O This phrase is said to be a reference to Admiral Horatio Nelson (1758-1805), who lifted a telescope to his blind eye at the Battle of Copenhagen (1801), thereby ensuring that he failed to see his superior’s signal to discontinue the action. A less usual j version, referring directly to this story, is turn a Nelson eye.

3.What phrase did British Admiral Horatio Nelson coin thanks to a battle injury? “Break a leg” “Turn a blind eye” “Long in the tooth” “Give the cold shoulder”

There were tennis courts and a swimming pool at the school. I didn’t take tennis, but one summer a keep fit regime was started. At about 7.00 am we were taken to the tennis courts where we did press-ups, star jumps, and lots of exercises in the dewy, cool morning air. I remembering it lasting a week or so, and then strangely we never did it again.

4.What phrase did British Admiral Horatio Nelson coin thanks to a battle injury? “Break a leg” “Turn a blind eye” “Long in the tooth” “Give the cold shoulder”

O This phrase is said to be a reference to Admiral Horatio Nelson (1758-1805), who lifted a telescope to his blind eye at the Battle of Copenhagen (1801), thereby ensuring that he failed to see …

5.What phrase did British Admiral Horatio Nelson coin thanks to a battle injury? “Break a leg” “Turn a blind eye” “Long in the tooth” “Give the cold shoulder”

The whole ; phrase is used in stage directions in j Shakespeare to indicate a battle scene. alight set the world alight: see SET. alive alive and kicking prevalent and very active Mark Tully No Full Stops in India You deliberately choose unknown actors, although India is a country where the star system is very much alive and kicking. alive and well still existing or active (often used to deny …

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